replica rolex

How The New Yorker is capitalizing on its Trump bump

March 10, 2017

By Lucia Moses

When The New Yorker put its site behind a metered paywall in November of 2014, the expectation was that traffic would go down. Not only did traffic increase 30 percent within a few months (it’s now 15.6 million uniques), but subscriptions grew 85 percent year over year.

Then came the election, which delivered The New Yorker’s biggest month ever in subscription growth in January, when it sold 100,000, a 300 percent increase over the year-ago month. Circulation is now the highest it’s ever been, at 1.1 million, a combination of print/digital, print-only and digital-only.

For The New Yorker, it’s evidence that there’s a far bigger paying audience out there for its particular brand of journalism, especially among young readers.

“There’s tremendous opportunity now, and this is a chance to expand on what we started a few years ago,” said Pam McCarthy, deputy editor of The New Yorker.

Other publications including The New York Times and Washington Post are enjoying a new-found interest from people willing to pay premium prices for high-quality journalism since Trump’s election; The New Yorker charges $99 a year after an intro offer of $12 for 12 weeks. But the famous literary and culture weekly has been benefiting from groundwork it laid for subscriber growth long before the election.

Unlike other publications that are going after reader revenue to offset flagging ad revenue, The New Yorker is still growing on the ad side. For the first two months of the year, advertising rose 20 percent year over year, most of that coming from digital. Still, reader revenue is a growing part of the mix, driving 55 percent of the revenue, so the priority is turning readers into paying subscribers.

Working with Monica Ray, evp of consumer marketing for parent Condé Nast, The New Yorker has been using social media to expose the brand to a wider audience and push them down the funnel to subscribe.

“The writing from these incredible writers hasn’t reached its full audience,” Ray said. “I really believe we’re just getting started.”

Part of that is finding top-performing stories on Facebook and recirculating them with paid posts that it targets to people based on their interests, as it did with this one on why we think the way we do and this one on the return of civil disobedience.

Newsletters are another reliable avenue for growth. Newsletter subscribers are more likely than the average person to become paying subscribers, so The New Yorker has launched several around popular sections and individual writers, like cartoons, fiction and humor writer Andy Borowitz, for a total of eight.

The New Yorker has spent a lot of time understanding reader behavior once they’re on site, and targeting them accordingly. For example, people who come to the site a lot or read a lot of politics news, indicating they’re likely to subscribe, might be pitched a newsletter or multiple subscription offers.

The New Yorker has also started marketing to college students and international readers, targeting discounted offers to them directly on the site and social channels based on their IP address.

The emphasis on social media and shift to smartphone and tablet, which …read more

Source:: Digiday

      

amateurfetishist.com analonly.org todominate.org fullfamilyincest.com